Commit 93f2b0e2 authored by Chipp Jansen's avatar Chipp Jansen Committed by node
Browse files

Update on Overleaf.

parent b49467a2
......@@ -33,9 +33,42 @@
The idea of reusing and reclaiming the devices, especially those discarded, that surround us. What if we could re-purpose these devices, and pool their resources to build our own duct-taped together ``cloud''?
\section*{Materials}
For the hardware hacking portion of the workshops (Section \ref{sec:hardware-hacking}), you will need:
\begin{itemize}
\item NEOS V2 SmartCam (the device we will hack)
\item Small Philips screw-driver with a long neck (Figure \ref{fig:screwdriver})
\item A \textit{spudger} (preferably metal) or a butter knife. (Figure \ref{fig:spudger})
\item 3 Solder-less test-point connectors (small plastic bits)
\end{itemize}
For connecting to and re-programming the device (Section \ref{sec:rooting-device}), you will need either:
%
% Tools
% - Screw-driver
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/screwdriver}
\caption{Screwdriver with long shaft, Philips size 0 works, although other sizes work as well.}
\label{fig:screwdriver}
\end{figure}
%
% - Spudger
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/spudger}
\caption{Spudgers are small flat plastic or metal wedges used to pry open electronics casing. A dull butter knife works as well.}
\label{fig:spudger}
\end{figure}
\section*{Day 1}
\section{Hardware Hacking}
\section{Hardware Hacking} \ref{sec:hardware-hacking}
\subsection{Good devices to Hack}
Early IoT devices have the worst security. Also, lesser-known or ``generic'' brand of devices might not have the incentive or motivation to instill good security. For example, for Apple or Amazon, having an insecure device makes headlines and bad press. Also, larger companies have the resources to invest in security.
......@@ -93,36 +126,13 @@ From our research online, we can find the main processor of the NEOS, which is t
\subsubsection{Tear-down}
Here's a step-by-step tear down of the device. You'll need:
\begin{itemize}
\item Small Philips screw-driver with a long neck (Figure \ref{fig:screwdriver})
\item A \textit{spudger} (preferably metal) or a butter knife. (Figure \ref{fig:spudger})
\end{itemize}
%
% Tools
% - Screw-driver
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/screwdriver}
\caption{Screwdriver with long shaft, Philips size 0 works, although other sizes work as well.}
\label{fig:screwdriver}
\end{figure}
%
% - Spudger
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/spudger}
\caption{Spudgers are small flat plastic or metal wedges used to pry open electronics casing. A dull butter knife works as well.}
\label{fig:spudger}
\end{figure}
Here's a step-by-step tear down of the device.
%
% Opening the case
%
\parapgraph{Opening the case}
\paragraph{Opening the case}
You will see that the NEOS (Figure \ref{fig:outside-iso}) has a leg that unfolds (Figure \ref{fig:front}). Looking underneath the camera on its foot reveals some addition information (Figure \ref{fig:underneath}), notably the MAC (Media Access Control \footnote{\url{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAC_address}} address. The MAC address is handy to identify the device once it joins a network.
% - Outside
......@@ -304,7 +314,7 @@ Start unwrapping the assembly by lifting the camera side off and unplugging the
\label{fig:assembly-camera-remove}
\end{figure}
Remove the middle board from the plastic mounting bracket by unscrewing only the two outer screws (Figure ). Do not remove the interior screws. They hold the camera module in place, and removing them might disturb the alignment of the camera optics.
Remove the middle board from the plastic mounting bracket by unscrewing only the two outer screws (Figure \ref{fig:assembly-middle-board}). Do not remove the interior screws. They hold the camera module in place, and removing them might disturb the alignment of the camera optics.
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
......@@ -313,28 +323,28 @@ Remove the middle board from the plastic mounting bracket by unscrewing only the
\label{fig:assembly-middle-board}
\end{figure}
Figure \ref{fig:internals-spread-out} shows the three boards. On the left is the the camera board, with the unplugged camera power cable. In the middle is the USB board (with the plug for the WIFI antenna). On the right is the SD-CARD reader, the power plug for the camera power cable and a button.
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.9\textwidth]{figures/guts}
\caption{Internals spread out}
\label{fig:guts}
\includegraphics[width=0.9\textwidth]{figures/internals-spread-out}
\caption{Internal boards spread out: (\textit{left}) camera board, (\textit{center}) USB board, (\textit{right}) SD-CARD board.}
\label{fig:internals-spread-out}
\end{figure}
\paragraph{Tour of the boards}
% \begin{figure}[h!]
% \centering
% \includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/with-out-middle-plastic}
% \caption{Internals without middle plastic}
% \label{fig:with-out-middle-plastic}
% \end{figure}
Let's take a closer look at each of the boards. When investigating new hardware, we want to take note of the types of chips, markings on the circuit boards and look for \textit{debug} ports. These are typically unsoldered pads or exposed pads on the circuit board, used to diagnose or program the piece of hardware. Commercial hardware will typically go through a quality control stage, where it's circuit boards are placed in a test rig which attaches to \textit{test points} on the board. These test points are also helpful as they might give easy access to certain pins on chips mounted on the board.
\textcolor{red}{TODO - Tour of top/bottom of each board}
Figure \ref{fig:guts-middle-board} is the top of the USB board. In the upper right-hand corner of the board are three through-hole solder pads in a row. This is a good indication of a debug port in the form of a serial port, formally known as a UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transceiver) port \footnote{\url{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_asynchronous_receiver-transmitter}}.
% TODO - new picture WITHOUT the soldered headers.
\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{figures/guts-middle-board-good}
\caption{Internals middle board, in the upper right is the debug port}
\caption{Internals of the USB board, in the upper right is the debug port}
\label{fig:guts-middle-board}
\end{figure}
......@@ -377,7 +387,7 @@ Run screen to access the serial port on the device. Once you turn on the device
In the next part we look at how people access and modify the firmware for the device.
\section{Rooting the Device}
\section{Rooting the Device} \label{sec:rooting-device}
\subsection{Boot loaders}
U-Boot % https://source.denx.de/u-boot/u-boot/blob/HEAD/doc/README.autoboot
......
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